A recent book on baseball umpires, reviewed positively, is entitled “As They See ‘Em”.  That reminded me of  a comment in the New Yorker many years ago about  hree umpires explaining how they called ‘em.

-- The first umpire said “Some’s balls and some’s strikes, and I calls ‘em as they is.”  

-- The second said “Some’s balls and some’s strikes and I calls ‘em as I sees ‘em.”

-- The third explained: “Some’s balls and some’s strikes, but they ain’t nothin’ till I calls ‘em.”  

This takes me right back to philosophy (and sometimes theology) class. What is truth?     

-- The first is the dogmatist. He is sure of his grasp of  objective truth--as they is.    

-- The second, more honestly, admits his own perspective is a bit more relative, or subjective. Truth depends upon his own eyesight and judgment--as he sees ‘em.

-- The third is also dogmatic, and I believe  the most dangerous. He is in charge, he constructs or imposes what he sees, his truth upon reality--as he calls ‘em.

How this applies to various media writers and commentators, and how this applies to spiritual and temporal leaders, I leave up to the viewer to decide.

Peter Schineller, S.J.

Comments

Anonymous | 3/23/2009 - 2:24pm
Jever hear of the Magisterium? the Holy Father? Of Jesus Christ, Who is the Way and the Life and the Truth?
Anonymous | 3/22/2009 - 10:48pm
Well, you make a good point; on the other hand, for the sake of the game the pitch needs to be called; it is what I call it, as I see it and hopefully what it is. In the past there was no possibility of a replay, only a gathering of opinions; now, we can have a digital view within a framework of references. So, whatever the philosophy and attitude of the ump, still there is the truth and it can be determined. Still, was it a spit ball? I saw on national news a 5 second notice of the Pope at a Mass in Angola Africa attended by 1 million people. 30 seconds were given to the following news article about an actress. Hmmmm.