One sentence, one beautiful sentence at the end of Paul’s second letter to the Corinthians (13:13) and it is clear that the notion of God has been transformed in the life and worship of the early Church:

The grace of the Lord Jesus Christ,

the love of God,

and the fellowship of the Holy Spirit be with all of you.

Ben F. Meyer wrote that the idea of the Trinity "imposed" itself on the early Church, in this case Paul, not through carefully worded dogmatic statements or philosophical treatises but through the lived reality of God in the lives of the believers. It would be centuries before the Councils of the 4th and 5th centuries could "define" the Trinitarian nature of God, but it had been experienced for centuries prior to that. It is clear when you read the Scriptures with Trinitarian eyes that you see the relationship between Father, Son and Holy Spirit, that the definition itself begins to emerge from the descriptions of God, specifically in the pages of the New Testament.

What is often lost today is the radical nature of speaking of this relationship in light of Jewish understanding of God’s Oneness. Paul, schooled as a Pharisee, would have been able to cite verse after verse from Israel’s Scripture regarding the Oneness of God, just as Jesus himself did in reciting the Shema from Deuteronomy 6:4 (see Matthew 22:37 and parr.): God is One. It was the overwhelming sense of the love of God, felt in the grace of the Lord Jesus Christ and poured out in the fellowship, the koinonia, or communion, of the Holy Spirit that lead to this transformed understanding of God. God’s Oneness was lived in three "persons" (or hypostases). This itself was realized in the life of the earliest Christians as they experienced the grace, love and communion of the living God in their midst. We need to pay attention to Paul's final phrase, which does not focus on the definition so much as the abiding presence of God in the life of the believers: may this grace, love and fellowship "be with all of you." It defines not only the reality of God, but it ought to describe also the life of the Church together.

John W. Martens

Follow me on Twitter @johnwmartens

Comments

NORMA NUNAG | 6/21/2011 - 11:29pm
Thank you for rousing me up to St. Paul's:  The Grace of the Lord Jesus Christ, the love of God, and the fellowship of the Holy Spirit be with all of you!  I heard it so many times that I actually didn't hear the message!   Yes,Almighty God is a relational God, a Triune God of God the Father, God the Son (the Word, Jesus Christ), and God the Holy Spirit.  And Holy Mother Church is also relational, a community of the faithful living the reality of St. Paul's one beautiful sentence from 2nd Corinthians 13:13.













Michelle Russell | 6/20/2011 - 8:16pm
John, Thank you for pulling out this "one beautiful sentence" and reminding us (me) to pay attention and consider the words.  This is a phrase that I hear so often (and for so many years), that it tends to just flow right past me.  Indeed, it is so ingrained in us as a part of Mass that a large number of people here responded "and also with you" just out of habit.  That elicited a few laughs, but was it also. perhaps, a sign that many of us do just flow through Mass without really hearing the words or thinking about them or praying with them?  It is beautiful and inspiring to take each part of the final sentence and meditate upon what each part means to us as a Church and me as an individual.  And your final paragraph leaves me with much to ponder - so much power in such a few words.