Books

  • Dawn Eden is a Catholic convert, author and speaker known for her work on sexuality and chastity. She is also a survivor of childhood sexual abuse who seeks to share her healing process with others.

  • July 21-28, 2014

    We know for sure that someone is permanently relevant when his or her name becomes an adjective. In the week—last week of March 2014—I finished the most recent of the very many intellectual biographies of George Orwell, his adjectived name appeared twice in Brooklyn (in our diocesan newspaper and in the Playbill for a performance of “King Lear” at the newly completed Polanski Shakespeare Center), as well as in a New York Times op-ed essay. In this respect at...

  • July 21-28, 2014

    While scholarly literature about the Holocaust is vast and continually expanding, writings about the members (admittedly very few in number) of the resistance are still quite rare. Men and women familiar to scholars, like Gertrud Luckner, John M. Oesterreicher, Dietrich Bonhoeffer and Henri de Lubac are often viewed as isolated heroes, presciently calling into the void alone.

  • July 21-28, 2014

    One of the many expressions of the “Francis effect” is the renewed prominence of “mercy.” Pope Francis, of course, is not the first pope to speak of mercy in the context of God’s relationship with humanity, but it is certainly his signature tune—the word occurs more than 30 times in “The Joy of the Gospel.”

  • Eve Tushnet, a writer in Washington D.C., blogs at the Patheos Catholic portal. Born in 1978 and raised with some Jewish religious influence, she graduated from Yale University in 2000. In 1998 she surprised her family and friends by converting to Catholicism as a 20-year old Yale sophomore. Describing herself as an “openly lesbian and celibate Catholic,” Ms.

  • July 7-14, 2014

    Successful political biographies offer insight both on their individual subject and the time in which that person lived. More rare is the biography that teaches something about who we are as Americans. Jordan Goodman’s latest biography, written with the subtlety and humility befitting a black renaissance man, lifts a mirror to America.

  • July 7-14, 2014

    What better way to introduce our readers to more black Catholic writers than to ask a selection of black Catholic intellectuals to tell us about their favorite books by their fellow writers? We are happy to present this rich cross section of men and women and a mix of history, biography, liturgy, music and fiction that presents a broader picture of creativity and the Catholic Church in the United States.

  • June 23-30, 2014

    On Feb. 21, 2012, a group of Russian female performance artists slipped into Moscow’s Cathedral of Christ the Savior to stage “A Punk Prayer,” beseeching “Virgin Mary, Mother of God, chase Putin out” and to protest the impending re-election of Vladimir Putin to his third term as president. The group chose the cathedral for the action because the church supported the Russian regime and symbolized the luxury and commercialism of the era.

  • June 23-30, 2014

    James Martin, S.J., the engaging author of this book on Jesus, had to be persuaded to travel to the Holy Land by his fellow Jesuit, Drew Christiansen, S.J., then editor in chief of America. Martin felt he knew enough about Jesus and the Gospels from a lifetime of study and reflection and didn’t need to travel to the Middle East. But he finally agreed to go—and the readers of this book on Jesus will be grateful.

  • June 23-30, 2014

    Sand between the pages: that pretty much captures how I feel. Even without a summer vacation, a blue horizon, a rich red sunset off Acapulco, Long Island or Nantucket, a good summer read engages me. Well, sure, not everyone gets to the beach in the summer. Yet there’s a certain moment when summer hits hard, temperatures soar and many of us yearn to get lost in a book. Mary Higgins Clark is that sort of reader and that sort of writer.