The National Catholic Review

Books

  • January 5-12, 2015

    What precisely happened to Margaret Reilly’s body throughout her brief adult life remains a mystery. A Roman Catholic nun, she was said to have received the bleeding wounds of Christ, the indelible image of a crucifix on her breast and terrible physical torments that evoked Jesus’ passion. These trials seemed to confer holiness on this New York City Irishwoman of modest origins. Reilly became a Good Shepherd sister in the early 1920s and lived at the order’s...

  • January 5-12, 2015

    This book begins with the personal testimony of an undergraduate student at a California college who, just a few weeks after learning that she was awarded a coveted scholarship she hoped would change her life and provide security for her Mexican family, received a sudden visit from U.S. immigration officials. They were prepared to arrest her and her father for illegal entry into the United States.

  • January 5-12, 2015

    Since 2003, when the renowned Anglican Scripture scholar N. T. Wright published the third volume (on the resurrection of Jesus) in his series “Christian Origins and the Question of God,” the biblical guild has eagerly awaited his fourth volume, on Pauline theology. The decade-long wait is attributable to at least two factors: 1) Wright, in addition to academic pursuits, served as bishop of Durham from 2003 to 2010; and 2) the volume on Paul extends to over 1,...

  • December 22-29, 2014

    When Pope Francis, during his recent visit to the Holy Land, spontaneously got out of his jeep in Bethlehem, touched his forehead to the security wall that separates Jews from Arabs and silently prayed for the suffering of Palestinian children, the gesture was widely seen as an expression of his love for humanity. Israel’s Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, however, was reportedly taken aback and asked the pope to visit a memorial to the Jewish victims of...

  • December 22-29, 2014

    Antonin Scalia did not grow up the son of typical Italian immigrants. Unlike most of us, whose fathers were brick-layers and masons, carpenters, steel-workers and coal-miners, his father was a university professor. As Scalia has said, he was not the poor son of immigrants who had to lift themselves up by their bootstraps.

  • December 22-29, 2014

    Almost invariably, most of us go through life as if death is something that happens to other people. Yet every day that passes means we have one less day to live. Death is Time’s shadow. Gnosticism and acedia assure death’s prominence in Modernism.

  • December 8-15, 2014

    After endless news articles, interviews, and collections of the pope’s own words, is there anything new to learn about Pope Francis? The answer, as demonstrated by the sharply conflicting interpretations of his role in the Synod on the Family, is clearly yes.

  • December 8-15, 2014

    The Pacific theater of World War II is often thought of as a forgotten war. But anyone who reads Richard Flanagan’s sixth novel, The Narrow Road to the Deep North, will not soon forget it.

    Set in a Japanese prisoner of war camp, the story expertly blends fact and fiction as it brings to life a gut-wrenching and soul-changing experience. That is not an exaggeration, and this book is not for the faint of heart.

  • December 1, 2014

    The study of Catholic women religious is “hot.” Academic and non-academic writers, documentary filmmakers and the media are producing and publishing materials in record numbers highlighting the lives and work of American Catholic sisters/nuns. Even funding agencies and foundations are beginning to open their pockets (just slightly) to support academics and independent scholars who are pursuing the many narratives that trace the historical and contemporary...

  • November 24, 2014

    History happens. In 1960 as John F. Kennedy ran for President, I headed to graduate school to study American political history. J.F.K. enchanted me; after that no president won my heart. Catholicism filtered—sometimes shaped—my judgments about politics and presidents. And, I have to admit, my judgments about politics and presidents sometimes filtered my understanding of faith and my judgments about my church. The dialogue of faith and culture, so beloved by...