The National Catholic Review

Culture

December 2014

  • December 11, 2014

    While Jesus spent 40 days and nights in the wilderness, Reese Witherspoon spends about three months there in Wild as the self-flagellating author Cheryl Strayed, albeit with a nylon tent, gas stove, water-purification tablets, James Michener paperbacks and a paralyzing aversion to serpents. Mortification of the flesh is one thing. Cold/hunger/boredom is quite another.

  • December 11, 2014

    Almost invariably, most of us go through life as if death is something that happens to other people. Yet every day that passes means we have one less day to live. Death is Time’s shadow. Gnosticism and acedia assure death’s prominence in Modernism.

  • December 11, 2014

    When Pope Francis, during his recent visit to the Holy Land, spontaneously got out of his jeep in Bethlehem, touched his forehead to the security wall that separates Jews from Arabs and silently prayed for the suffering of Palestinian children, the gesture was widely seen as an expression of his love for humanity. Israel’s Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, however, was reportedly taken aback and asked the pope to visit a memorial to the Jewish victims of terror attacks.

  • December 11, 2014

    Antonin Scalia did not grow up the son of typical Italian immigrants. Unlike most of us, whose fathers were brick-layers and masons, carpenters, steel-workers and coal-miners, his father was a university professor. As Scalia has said, he was not the poor son of immigrants who had to lift themselves up by their bootstraps.