The Good Word

A blog on Scripture and preaching.

April 2014

  • Apr 21 2014 - 2:02pm
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    In the first entry in the Bible Junkies Online Commentary on Galatians, I discussed introductory matters concerning the founding of the churches to the Galatians, the situation when Paul wrote to them, when the letter might have been written and the type of letters which Paul wrote, based on the common Greco-Roman letters of his day.

  • Apr 21 2014 - 10:05am
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    I confess I found myself straining this week to find the words to give voice for you to the wonder of the Resurrection. Christ’s resurrection, and our share in it, should be overwhelmingly real to us. But it is not. Alas, faith’s experience of resurrection is more like the first blossoms of spring after a long, cold winter, an awareness of tender, improbable beauty.

  • Apr 19 2014 - 11:44am
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    Sometimes pleasures and joys slide one over the other.  They pour so quickly into our lives, we begin to believe the cup of blessings can’t run dry.  But then some crack appears.  The blessing cup becomes hourglass, and happiness begins to pour away.   

  • Apr 17 2014 - 4:42pm
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    In 1945 a young Flannery O’Conner graduated from Georgia State College for Women.  She then went off to the University of Iowa, to study journalism.  College hadn’t really challenged the Roman Catholic faith, implanted in her by family and the parochial schools of Savannah, Georgia. The University of Iowa did.  Like so many students today, O’Connor changed her course of study.  She abandoned journalism and enrolled in the prestigious Iowa Writers’ Workshop.

  • Apr 16 2014 - 4:41pm
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    Religion has a way of ruining most everything, especially the sacred.   You can already see the problem in the two Latin words.  Religare means “to bind up” or “to fasten down.”  Sacrare means “to cut off.”  So, by its nature, religion seeks to make routine that which, by its nature, cannot be captured, namely, the sacred. 

  • Apr 11 2014 - 4:37pm
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    Behold, your king comes to you meek
    and riding on an ass
    (Matt 21:5; Zec 9:9)  
     
  • Apr 10 2014 - 8:30am
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    Killing Jesus is a sure and swift read.  Bill O’Reilly and Martin Dugard write like newscasters, rapidly analyzing facts. Here is the entry into Jerusalem:

  • Apr 7 2014 - 11:59pm
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    In the first entry in the Bible Junkies Online Commentary on Galatians, I discussed introductory matters concerning the founding of the churches to the Galatians, the situation when Paul wrote to them, when the letter might have been written and the type of letters which Paul wrote, based on the common Greco-Roman letters of his day.

  • Apr 3 2014 - 11:27am
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    Lazarus died twice. In both instances, Jesus was far from his side. The first time he died in the uncertain hope of his people. The second, Lazarus entered death’s darkness, knowing Christ’s resurrection. 

    Have you ever thought about how you’d like to die? Most of us don’t. When we imagine our deaths, we picture funerals filled with grieving relatives and friends, but not the details of our departure. Yet, as Ernest Hemmingway pointed out, “every man’s life ends the same way. It is...

  • Apr 1 2014 - 12:15pm
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    I am pleased to announce that the first Bible Junkies Online Commentary has been published! This book arose from my blogging and the weekly entries on the Gospel of Mark and so I see it as a special work. Its genesis began not necessarily with the writing, however, but with some readers who began to ask whether the finished product would be available in book form at some time. It seemed like a good idea and initially I thought that an e-book would...

  • Apr 1 2014 - 12:02am
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    In the first entry in the Bible Junkies Online Commentary on Galatians, I discussed introductory matters concerning the founding of the churches to the Galatians, the situation when Paul wrote to them, when the letter might have been written and the type of letters which Paul wrote, based on the common Greco-Roman letters of his day.