Check out the images by Eric Fischer that offer stark reminders that major American cities are still quite segregated. Using data from the 2000 census, Fischer uses colored dots to signify the majority ethincity of people in a given area. Check out some examples below (red is white, blue is black, green is Asian, orange is Hispanic, gray is other, and each dot is 25 people):

Washington, DC. The center of the image shows the east-west divide between white and black residents.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Detroit, MI. One of the most striking examples of segregation, this image of Detroit shows the perfect line that separates black and white residents.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

New York, NY. New York City's population is dense, but different population pockets are still visible.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Comments

Vince Killoran | 10/1/2010 - 8:36am
I'm interested to know: what are "the limitations that made the simplification possible"?

I think one of the visuals that would be useful would be a class representation of segregation-much more difficult since our census and other data don't historically lend themselves to this factor (didn't you know: the USA doesn't has classes!). In the Detroit map, this could account for the move that began in ernest in the 1980s of the black middle class to suburbs.
David Cruz-Uribe | 9/30/2010 - 8:42am
These are not raw statistics:  these are graphical representations of raw data (2000 census population data).  From my professional perspective (as a mathematician I regularly teach statistics), these are quite nice visual representations of numerical data and serve to convey an essential fact of life in most urban areas in the United States:  that housing is still highly segregated.  What is there to be wary of?