The National Catholic Review

Opinion

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  • February 15, 2016

    Among the common misconceptions about Jesuits are the following: First, we all have multiple Ph.D.’s. (I have zero.) Second, we all speak Latin. (I do not.) Third, we have all spent many years teaching. (Not me, which I count as a loss.) Finally, we all travel to Rome frequently.

    Before last week, however, I had been only three times to Catholic headquarters. All in all, then, I can’t say I knew Rome very well....

  • February 15, 2016

    Osama bin Laden has been dead almost five years now, but the movement associated with him is still very much around. The Islamic State may have eclipsed Al Qaeda in the terror it holds for Americans, or the attraction it holds for young Muslims flocking to its self-proclaimed caliphate, but the terror group that the United States went to war with in 2001 is alive and well, with branches today in North Africa, the Arabian Peninsula, the Levant, Central Asia...

  • February 15, 2016

    When men join the Jesuits they are reminded that few Jesuits become famous—John Courtney Murray, Pope Francis—but many will engage in unsung work in which they touch countless lives. Edward Glynn, S.J., born one of nine children in Clarks Summit, Pa., joined the Society of Jesus in 1955 and was ordained in 1967. Known early as an athlete, sports fan, intellectual and activist, he was also a natural leader.

    In the early...

  • February 15, 2016

    Pope Francis will set out on his 12th foreign journey on Feb. 12, this time heading for Mexico, the second most populous Catholic country in the world (after Brazil) where some 90 percent of its 125 million population are Catholic.

    “The Holy Father wanted to visit the country from border to border and to meet with people who are living through difficult situations,” Archbishop Christophe Pierre, the nuncio, told Noticias MVS...

  • February 15, 2016

    “People are pouring across the southern border,” the Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump said in a debate in December. That image has helped to make immigration reform all but impossible in the current Congress, and it has reinforced the idea that we have lost control of migration into the United States.

    In fact, the total number of undocumented migrants in the United States fell to 10.9 million in 2014, its...

  • February 15, 2016

    In the wake of the agreement on limiting its nuclear programs, Iran has been busy trying to present itself as open to the modern world and re-establishing economic and political relations with the West. To that end, Iran’s President Hassan Rouhani has embarked on a tour of European capitals. He started with Italy and the Vatican, where on Jan. 26 he met with Pope Francis.

    But according to a recent report by Amnesty...

  • February 15, 2016

    T. S. Eliot once famously wrote, “April is the cruelest month.” If I were to revise his critique of time and its assaults upon the human spirit, I’d substitute “February.”

    Yes, February. The short month, the dearth month, the pine-for-all-you’re-worth month—the relief of spring just on the horizon, but nowhere near in sight.

    February, the sophomore slump of the winter months. The snow is old....

  • February 15, 2016

    T he water coming out of taps in Flint, Mich., has been a frightening orange-brown for more than a year now, but the official declaration of a state of emergency was made only last month. In April 2014, under the direction of state-appointed emergency managers, the financially distressed city switched from using water purchased from Detroit to drawing its water from the Flint River to save money. Corrosive water running through old pipes caused lead to leach into the drinking...

  • February 8, 2016

    When a leading candidate for the U.S. presidency refers to Mexican immigrants as rapists and criminals and rises in the polls; when his competitors joust over who will build a bigger wall and expel more undocumented persons; when the outgoing administration steps up deportation raids to deter future migrants, it is time to reframe the conversation in the United States about our southern neighbor.

    Pope Francis’ upcoming...

  • February 8, 2016

    Most readers would agree that reading a magazine is worthwhile if we learn just one new thing from every issue. In the present instance, I will spare you the anticipation by providing it right up front; it is not one new thing, in fact, but two. And these two things, which I’m guessing you don’t know, concern some of your favorite people: Jesuits.

    The first thing you should know is that Jesuits are not as smart as we...