The Editors

On Nov. 26, 2013, Pope Francis issued "Evangelii Gaudium" or “The Joy of the Gospel,” his first extensive piece of writing as pope. Below is a round up of news coverage and reflections on the apostolic exhortation.

PODCAST: "The Francis Factor," November 27

America's Washington Front columnist John Carr analyzes Pope Francis' apostolic exhortation "Evangelii Gaudium."

BLOGS: "Francis' Multi-faceted Reflection," In All Things, Rev. Robert P. Imbelli, December 2

"A theology unmoored from the kerygma is no longer faith wholeheartedly seeking understanding, no longer hope giving an account of its sure basis in the risen Christ, no longer love speaking passionately of its Beloved."

"Pope Francis: Still Finding His Own Voice?" In All Things, Francis X. Clooney, S.J., November 30

"The paragraph puts the non-Christians in their place, whereas what is needed is rather a more enthusiastic sense that “we” – Christians and non-Christians alike –have a shared task in the world of this new century, all of of us energized by faith."

"The Church Encounters the World," In All Things, Drew Christiansen, S.J., November 27

"Francis revives one of the most important tools for engagement with the world that had been suppressed for the last 30 years: the reading of the Signs of the Times as a task of the whole people of God. "

"The Dignity of the Vulnerable," In All Things, Meghan J. Clark, November 27

“'I prefer a Church which is bruised, hurting, and dirty because it has been out in the streets, rather than a Church which is unhealthy from being confined and clinging to its own security' (49). Thus "Evangelium Gaudium" places the work of the Catholic Campaign for Human Development and Catholic Relief Services at the center of the church’s evangelization."

"On Our Pilgrim Way," In All Things, Amanda C. Osheim, November 27

"Through dialogue and each other we discern our personal and communal response to God. Francis indicates that all the baptized are “missionary disciples” and “agents of evangelization” (No. 120). Our graced response is our collective responsibility."

"Francis on the 'Joy of the Gospel'": Pope lays out his vision for an evangelical church, Catholic News Service. November 26

"Pope Francis' voice is unmistakable in the 50,000-word document's relatively relaxed style—he writes that an "evangelizer must never look like someone who has just come back from a funeral!"—and its emphasis on some of his signature themes, including the dangers of economic globalization and "spiritual worldliness.""

"A New Vision for the Church," In All Things, James Martin, S.J., November 26

"It seems that with each new homily, address, interview, general audience message and letter, Pope Francis is challenging himself—and us—with three questions, each of which flows naturally from the other: First, Why not look at things from a new perspective? Second, Why not be open to doing things in a new way?  And third, Why not have a new vision for the church?"

"Making All Things New and Beginning Again," In All Things, Daniel P. Horan, O.F.M., November 26

"One of the things most striking to me about "Evangelii Gaudium is what Pope Francis says about the contemporary phrase “the new evangelization.” Rather than emphasizing that evangelization, as such, needs to be made new, he redirects our attention to ourselves as individuals and a church to see that weare the ones who need to be made new or, as the pope’s namesake said eight-hundred-years before, it is we who need to begin again to serve the Lord God."

"Recasting the New Evangelization Framework in Light of the Poor: Early Highlights and Analysis of Evangellii Gaudium," Kevin Ahern (Daily Theology)

"Whereas earlier texts on the new evangelization focused primarily on the problems posed by secularism, sexual immorality and the “dechristianization of Europe,” Francis hits hard on economic inequalities throughout the world. For him, it seems that it is economic inequality—not secularization—that is the major issue that the church is called to address."

VIDEO: Key points of "Evangellii Gaudium," Catholic News Service

Comments

Joseph Manta | 12/2/2013 - 8:40pm

Ok. So arrogant wasn't the right thing to say. Sorry, but I still wonder about the other topics I mentioned.

Joseph Manta | 12/2/2013 - 2:32pm

When Pope Francis began his Pontificate I was really very hopeful. I welcomed his informality and was eager for his dedication to the poor. But over the short time of his Pontificate, I began to wonder:
Wonder when he is going to speak as charitably and understandingly to Catholics, especially the clergy, as he does when he speaks to atheists;
Wonder when he is going to realize he is Pope, not to just South America, but to the world:
Wonder when he became an expert on the state of the economy in every country in the world;
Wonder when he became an expert on delivering homilies such that he could lecture all priests on the topic:
Wonder how ignoring the groundwork of Cardinals from many countries fits into his complaint that too much is centralized in the Vatican.
And so now I wonder if perhaps the Holy Spirit does have a sense of humor and has given us a somewhat arrogant Jesuit as Pope.

Rick Malloy | 11/29/2013 - 11:27am

To Tom F. : You write that you want the Pope to do more than just bloviate. I've read the whole extraordinary Exhortation. This may be the most revolutionary papal document in centuries. It's bringing Gaudium et Spes out of the pulpits and pews and into the streets. Now, it's not what the Pope will do. Now it's what we will do to be evangelizers and not whiners and complainers that will make the difference. Picking on issues isn't the point (btw, the church does allow for divorce and remarriage after annulment, and NFP is an encouraged form of contraception, and all are called to make choices about these matters according to their rightly formed conscience). Let's get over our "issues", live prayerful lives of service, and get to work, joyfully proclaiming the Gospel.

Rick Malloy | 11/29/2013 - 11:27am

To Tom F. : You write that you want the Pope to do more than just bloviate. I've read the whole extraordinary Exhortation. This may be the most revolutionary papal document in centuries. It's bringing Gaudium et Spes out of the pulpits and pews and into the streets. Now, it's not what the Pope will do. Now it's what we will do to be evangelizers and not whiners and complainers that will make the difference. Picking on issues isn't the point (btw, the church does allow for divorce and remarriage after annulment, and NFP is an encouraged form of contraception, and all are called to make choices about these matters according to their rightly formed conscience). Let's get over our "issues", live prayerful lives of service, and get to work, joyfully proclaiming the Gospel.

THOMAS FARRELLY | 11/27/2013 - 5:07pm

I have not yet read The Joy of the Gospel but certainly will do so. I hope that the Pope does more than make statements and write exhortations like this. I hope he is not like Obama, someone who thinks a problem is solved by making a good speech. He urgently needs to take action that will encourage young men to think of becoming priests - and allowing priests to have a family life is the best way to do this. And admitting that the Church has erred in many of its teachings on family life - like asserting that contraception is offensive to God, and forbidding divorce and remarriage under any circumstances.

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