The National Catholic Review

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  • This is part three of a three-part series on Catholic colleges and universities led today by lay leaders after a history of priests or women religious at their helms. Read Part 1 on Trinity University Washington here and part 2 on the Catholic University of America...

  • We're less than two weeks from election day, so it's time to start writing the post-mortems, just to be prepared. Here are some of tomorrow's headlines today.

  • As I mentioned last week, I've lately been making my way through Jim Manney's A Simple Life-Changing Prayer: Discovering the Power of St. Ignatius Loyola's Examen (Loyola Press). It is a brief but substantive primer on Ignatian prayer and spirituality, ideal for personal reading or for reading groups. It's also accessible for students.  

    Manney's book has provided a nice refresher for me on some of the topics I know well but can never read about enough. Here is...

  • The New Republic’s Alice Robb writes that concern/hysteria over the Ebola virus may have Republicans whistling a happy tune in two weeks: “A growing body of literature in psychology suggests that feelings of fear make people’s political outlook more conservative.”

  • This is part one of a three-part series on Catholic colleges and universities led today by lay leaders after a history of priests or women religious at their helms. Read Part 1 on Trinity University Washington here.

    John Garvey, The Catholic University of America

  • Alice von Hildebrand is a Belgian-born Catholic philosopher who retired from the classroom in 1984 after teaching at Hunter College in New York City for 37 years.

  • As it has for most people, news of the Ebola virus has sparked many thoughts for me, and one of the things I keep returning to is the way fears about infection have highlighted our dependence and vulnerability. Inescapably we are social creatures. My good is connected to your good. Your decision-making affects my well-being. No man, to borrow from Donne, is an island.  

  • The recent two-week synod on the family has been an educational effort similar to that surrounding the Second Vatican Council and the U.S. bishops’ pastorals on peace and the economy. It led to hundreds of stories in media, prompted both sides of debates to make their cases on such neuralgic issues as receiving Holy Communion after divorce and remarriage and openness to lesbians and gays.

    It brought a degree of transparency even to those more comfortable hunkering down behind closed...

  • This is part one of a three-part series on Catholic colleges and universities led today by lay leaders after a history of priests or women religious at their helms.

    Catholic colleges and universities enroll an estimated 810,000 students, according to the Official Catholic Directory. For decades, and for some institutions for over a century, heads of these organizations have been members of religious orders that founded them. Others have been led by clergy.

  • In the Wall Street Journal today, Brian Casey, President of Depauw, speaks to Douglas Belkin about the value of a liberal arts education and the difficulties it faces today.

    On the challenges facing those toting Plato and quoting poetry, Casey said: