The National Catholic Review

Books

  • February 9, 2015

    Announcements of the irrelevancy, demise or uselessness of the just war tradition are commonly made. Those making the claims are sometimes adherents to the tradition of pacifism and nonviolence who are disillusioned with efforts to treat war as a morally legitimate enterprise. Or they may beso-called “realists,” who find talk of moral restraint in warfare foolish and naïve.

  • February 9, 2015

    Scholars rarely have the good fortune to be able to return to their initial field of interest after a long interruption. An exception to that rule is Robert Emmett Curran, professor emeritus of history at Georgetown University, who temporarily set aside his extensive research in colonial and early Catholic history in English-speaking North America 30 years ago to write a magisterial three-volume history of Georgetown University at the request of the president...

  • February 9, 2015

    Jacques Marquette was a Jesuit missionary and explorer. His missionary work included five years in remote northern Michigan (throughout I use today’s geographic terms), a challenging mission, and perhaps his life would have continued in relative anonymity except for his being assigned in 1673 to accompany Louis Joliet to explore the vast American heartland.

  • February 2, 2015

    The old maxim states that you should never judge a book by its cover. But in the case of Sally Ninham’s Ten African Cardinals, the cover lends ample insight into the book’s content. On the front are four miniature snapshots from Africa, mostly of children. On the back cover is a giant image of Sally Ninham herself. Likewise, Ten African Cardinals provides considerable insight into Dr. Ninham’s personal encounter with Africa but considerably less...

  • February 2, 2015

    In the past 12 months, at least nine new books in English on the Ten Commandments have been published by Christian and Jewish writers, both biblical scholars and ethicists. One may wonder what makes the renowned biblical scholar and Harvard Old Testament/Hebrew Bible lecturer Michael D. Coogan’s The Ten Commandments different from others.

  • February 2, 2015

    As numerous books, films and television series in recent years have demonstrated, there is a fascination, both in the scholarly world and among the wider public, with the Tudor period of English history in general and perhaps with the Elizabethan era in particular.

  • January 19-26, 2015

    One need not be a Sister of Mercy to appreciate Women of Faith. Historian Mary Beth Frazer Connolly has done extensive archival work to bring to life the work of Mother Catherine McAuley’s “daughters” since their arrival in Chicago in 1846.

  • January 19-26, 2015

    Why should anyone bother to read 400 pages about the life and the career of a man who died 30 years ago, an unknown second-level officer in the Central Intelligence Agency, even if the book is well researched and well-written? Answering this question requires us to work out some prior questions. This is quite appropriate, since we are dealing with an agency whose stock in trade is the answering of questions, even if the answers are not provided to the general...

  • January 19-26, 2015

    Malcolm X’s ideological journey from the black separatist Nation of Islam to his standing as an independent activist, renewed by a sense of Islam as a global faith, animates this probing, readable book by Saladin Ambar, an assistant professor of political science at Lehigh University in Bethlehem, Pa.

  • January 5-12, 2015

    What precisely happened to Margaret Reilly’s body throughout her brief adult life remains a mystery. A Roman Catholic nun, she was said to have received the bleeding wounds of Christ, the indelible image of a crucifix on her breast and terrible physical torments that evoked Jesus’ passion. These trials seemed to confer holiness on this New York City Irishwoman of modest origins. Reilly became a Good Shepherd sister in the early 1920s and lived at the order’s...