Faith

  • April 28-May 5, 2014
    Fourth Sunday of Easter (A), May 11, 2014

    Slaves in the Greco-Roman world were sometimes treated with kindness, but this was dependent upon the whims of masters, not legally required. Even domestic slaves, as mentioned in 1 Peter, were vulnerable to the demands of their masters, and 1 Pt 2:18 asks that they “accept the authority” of masters “with all deference, not only those who are kind and gentle but also those who are harsh.” Possessing no right to the integrity of their own bodies, such a...

  • April 28-May 5, 2014
    Third Sunday of Easter (A), May 4, 2014

    There is a richness to the story of the disciples on the road to Emmaus that makes it difficult to consume it in its entirety or to exhaust its sustenance. Even seemingly minor details nourish the reader in surprising ways. Emmaus itself, the village to which Cleopas and the unnamed disciple are journeying, appears elsewhere in the Bible in 1 Mc 3:40. It seems to bear little connection to Luke’s notice of the city, but there are intriguing links.

  • April 28-May 5, 2014

    As Pope John Paul II celebrates 25 years in office, the world is taking stock of a pontificate that has helped shape political events, set new directions for the Catholic Church and offered spiritual inspiration to millions of people around the globe.

  • April 28-May 5, 2014

    The greatness of a great man may have different aspects. An artist—Michelangelo, for example—is considered great only for his applied genius. […] Saintliness is certainly a criterion for greatness. Not all great men are saints, but all saints are great men. […]

  • April 21, 2014
    Second Sunday of Easter (A), April 27, 2014

    Shortly after the ascension, the number of believers in Jerusalem was about 120, according to Acts 1:15. Whether the number is exact or symbolic of a restored Israel, the church started small.

  • April 21, 2014

    St. Ignatius suggests that in prayer we contemplate Jesus appearing after his resurrection first to the Virgin Mary. He explains: “Though this is not mentioned explicitly in Scripture, it must be considered as stated when Scripture says that he appeared to many others.” The meditation that follows imagines how that encounter might have unfolded.

  • April 21, 2014

    Our family of five recently moved into a brick castle atop a hill owned by my husband’s host family. Dima, my husband, came to the United States as a child, without his parents, played hockey and attended school while living with a family that has since become his own, and mine. Their generosity extends into every aspect of our lives. Last spring, as we prepared for Pascha, the Orthodox celebration of Easter, they readied our Paschal basket with sausage and...

  • April 14, 2014
    Easter (A), April 20, 2014

    The modern historical Jesus enterprise stumbled from the beginning on data it found hard to accept: the early Christians claimed that Jesus, after being put to death by crucifixion, rose from the dead. Peter is recorded saying, “They put him to death by hanging him on a tree; but God raised him on the third day and allowed him to appear, not to all the people but to us who were chosen by God as witnesses, and who ate and drank with him after he rose from the...

  • April 7, 2014
    Palm Sunday of the Lord’s Passion (A), April 13, 2014

    The Gospel of Matthew presents Palm Sunday in the context of one of the Gospel’s many prophetic fulfillment citations, which demonstrate that Jesus was the promised one who would establish the kingdom of God. Matthew presents a free rendering of the prophecy from Zec 9:9 to explain Jesus’ entry into Jerusalem: “Rejoice greatly, O daughter Zion! Shout aloud, O daughter Jerusalem!

  • April 7, 2014

    Donna appears at the front door every so often, not exactly a friend but more than an acquaintance. A teacher of sorts, I suppose. Like the time she asked me to loan her $20 for an emergency, and I came to learn that it really was not a loan at all, but more like a gift, minus the generosity.