The National Catholic Review

News

  • November 10, 2014

    Recalling the words of St. John Paul II—“Don’t be afraid! Open your hearts wide to Christ”— Archbishop Terrence Prendergast, S.J., of Ottawa urged Canadians to remain steadfast after a shooting that left a Canadian soldier dead on Oct. 22. • Twelve Chaldean religious men and priests were suspended on Oct. 22 from their priestly ministry for not receiving permission from their superiors before seeking to emigrate from Iraq. • Archbishop Blase J...

  • Cardinal Luis Antonio Tagle of Manila said the Synod of Bishops on the family was more than a series of discussions on divorce and gay unions and that the impact of poverty on families, especially in Asia, was a major concern of participants.

    "Poverty is really affecting the Filipino family in a dramatic way," Cardinal Tagle told reporters at an Oct. 30 news conference.

  • Pope Francis pleaded for the international community to take stronger, coordinated steps to "annihilate" the Ebola virus and help the millions of people impacted by the disease.

    "As the Ebola virus epidemic worsens, I want to express my deep concern for this relentless illness that is spreading particularly on the African continent and especially among populations that are already disadvantaged," the pope said Oct. 29 at the end of his weekly general audience.

  • While the Nigerian government negotiates with the Islamic militant group Boko Haram for the release of 200 abducted schoolgirls, some church leaders in the country’s conflict-ridden north are expressing doubts about any impending resolution.

    Nearly two weeks ago, the government announced a cease-fire with the militants. It set Oct. 24 as the date for the girls’ release, but that failed to happen.

  • Pope Francis urged an international gathering of grassroots social activists to struggle against the "structural causes" of poverty and inequality, with a "revolutionary" program drawn from the Gospels.

    "The poor no longer wait, they seek to be protagonists, they organize, study, work, demand and, above all, practice that special solidarity that exists among those who suffer, among the poor," the pope said Oct. 28, to a Vatican-sponsored World Meeting of Popular Movements.

  • Burials that are dignified and safe are urgently needed for Ebola victims in West Africa, where corpses are frequently left unattended for days and then thrown into graves without ceremony, a U.S. church aid official said.

    "So many people are dying that there has not been the capacity to respond" to burial needs in an appropriate way and "we are now making this a priority," Michael Stulman, regional information officer for the U.S. bishops'...

  • November 10, 2014

    Stephanie Celustka prayed at Mass for an end to the Islamic State threat in the Middle East. The parishioner from San Diego’s St. Anne Catholic Church is among the 53 percent of Americans who said in a September Pew poll that they support a U.S. military campaign against ISIS, as the Islamic militants in Iraq and Syria are also called. “I think that it’s important that we protect the people who don’t have the ability to protect themselves,” Celustka said. “I...

  • November 10, 2014

    Sitting on the shaded front porch of his two-room cabin on a lazy August afternoon, Delphin Brock pointed toward the next mountain ridge, where a few weeks earlier heavy equipment was remaking the landscape. Then, he said, noise from the mining activity echoed over the mountains.

    “You could hear the scrapers. They were doin’ a lot of shootin’ over there, you know, using explosives,” Brock said.

  • November 10, 2014

    President Obama’s promised executive actions to fix parts of the immigration system will not come until after the Nov. 4 elections, but some analysts are predicting anything he does will be treated contentiously, with legal challenges and calls for impeachment.

  • November 10, 2014

    Pastoral mists, mellow fruitfulness and snivelling head colds are not the only signs of the end of summer here in Britain. For decades, a distinctive peculiarity of the political scene in the United Kingdom has been party conference season. Always a sure sign of autumn’s arrival, these events annually saw the Labour, Conservative or Liberal Democratic party faithful descending on an English Victorian seaside town over consecutive September weeks.