The National Catholic Review

Opinion

  • April 6, 2015

    While Christians believe in the Easter story, it is sometimes difficult for us to connect with Easter in a personal way. The events that we hear recounted during the Easter Triduum may sometimes seem far removed from our daily lives. But is it true that the Passion narratives and the story of Christ’s resurrection have no intersections with our present-day world? As St. Paul would say, “By no means!” Each moment of the triduum can offer important insights into our...

  • April 6, 2015

    Almost 15 years ago, St. John Paul II surprised the Catholic world by introducing a new set of mysteries to the Rosary. In case you’re unfamiliar with the tradition, there are certain events from the lives of Mary and Jesus that you can meditate on as you recite the Rosary. First are the joyful mysteries, like the Annunciation and the Visitation; then the sorrowful mysteries, like the Crucifixion; and finally, the glorious mysteries, like the Assumption of...

  • April 6, 2015

    Called to Account. Finally

    The battles of a civil war do not end when the fighting stops. Twenty-four years after a peace accord halted the bloody civil war in El Salvador, the individuals responsible for some of the war’s most violent episodes remain at large and beyond the reach of justice—but perhaps not for long.

  • April 6, 2015

    One of the greatest Christian writers who ever lived is the unknown author of this ancient homily from the second century, a meditation on Holy Saturday. Happy Easter from the editors and staff of America.

  • April 6, 2015

    From the moment “McFarland, USA” begins, you know how it will end. So the scenes described here do not quite qualify as spoilers. You can guess that Jim White, the gruff yet big-hearted running coach (whose surname also matches his ethnicity) played by Kevin Costner, will have a hard time adjusting to his abrupt move to the largely Mexican-American town of McFarland. You suspect that...

  • April 6, 2015

    Pope Francis’ revelation that he has “the feeling” that his papacy will be a short one has caused deep concern among many people worldwide, especially among the overwhelming majority of Catholics who worry what might happen to the radical reform and renewal of the church that he has started.

  • Where is the most dangerous place, and what is the greatest challenge for U.S. foreign policy? The terror of ISIS in the Middle East? Nuclear negotiations with Iran? A broken peace process in the Holy Land? Russian aggression in Ukraine? Actually, the most dangerous place for our nation’s foreign policy may be the United States Capitol. The greatest challenge may be how Congress frequently undermines, evades or polarizes essential choices about U.S. leadership in a dangerous world.

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  • March 30, 2015

    The work of John Courtney Murray, S.J., once an associate editor of this review, continues to dominate political theology in the United States.

  • March 30, 2015

    Sitting Down With Iran

  • March 30, 2015

    My life with Eugene Ionesco has been an odd one.

    I saw my first Ionesco play as a high school student. “The Bald Soprano” featured utter linguistic confusion as two couples, the Smiths and the Martins, traded non sequiturs in the Smiths’ prim living room. Miraculously, the director had squared the confusion by casting two pairs of identical twins as the leads. As the curtain fell, I had no idea what I had just seen. I only...