The National Catholic Review

Opinion

  • June 8-15, 2015

    Fifty years ago, a young scholar at the Department of Labor, Daniel Patrick Moynihan, wrote The Negro Family: The Case for National Action. “The racist virus in the American blood stream,” he said, “still afflicts us,” and “the Negro family in the urban ghettos is crumbling.” Mr. Moynihan had discovered that nearly a quarter of African-American births were “illegitimate.” Only a minority of African-American children who were 18 at that time had...

  • June 8-15, 2015

    This spring marks the 11th anniversary of my association with America, first as a Jesuit novice, then a regent, and lately as the 14th editor in chief. You might think that after all that time, I’d have learned pretty much all there is to know about America’s storied history and its spectacular, even eccentric cast of characters.

  • June 8-15, 2015

    Tracking Train Safety

    The Amtrak train derailment outside in North Philadelphia on May 12, which left eight people dead and scores injured, makes clear yet again that our nation’s transportation infrastructure urgently needs more than Band-Aid fixes. Sustained and systemic reforms are the only way to ensure that such tragedies do not become commonplace.

  • June 8-15, 2015

    Something akin to a resurrection is taking place in the Catholic Church in Latin America, thanks to Pope Francis. The memory of great church leaders is being revived and honored; the sacrifice of bishops and priests killed under military dictatorships is being recognized and venerated; and some theologians once accused of unorthodoxy are being embraced.

  • June 8-15, 2015

    Freddie Gray died on April 19 from spinal injuries sustained while he was in custody, being transported in a police van. Protests surrounding his death turned violent on the evening of April 25. The violence intensified on April 27, the day of Gray’s funeral, with a night of arson, looting and assault. Belatedly, the mayor declared a curfew and the governor a state of emergency. An uneasy quiet has since settled on the city as Baltimore wonders about its...

  • June 8-15, 2015

    ‘It sounds so Jewish!” one woman exclaimed during our recent pilgrimage to the Holy Land. We were in the Church of the Pater Noster, outside the walls of the Old City in Jerusalem. On this spot, according to tradition (which means it could have happened anywhere nearby), Jesus taught his disciples the Our Father. Our tour guide, a Melkite Catholic from Galilee named Maher, had just recited the prayer in Aramaic, Jesus’ native tongue.

  • May 25-June 1, 2015

    Pope Francis’ encyclical on the environment has not yet been published, but it is already being criticized, even attacked by forces within and outside the Catholic Church.

    That fact alone bears testimony to its relevance and importance. It also reveals the concern—even fear—among powerful and influential sectors that it could strongly affect the U.N. Conference on Climate Change in Paris, with consequences in the social, political and economic fields...

  • May 25-June 1, 2015

    The New York Post headline read “Art Attack” over a detailed report about the deadly assault—for the gunmen at least—at a convention center in Garland, Tex. The two men had attempted to storm an exhibit put together by the professional provocateur Pamela Geller through her American Freedom Defense Initiative.

  • May 25-June 1, 2015

    At a conference at Notre Dame in late April, speakers explored the issue of polarization in today’s church under the heading “Naming the Wounds, Beginning to Heal.” From a variety of backgrounds, they drew a picture of today’s Catholic Church in the United States with its polarities, tensions and different ways of thinking.

  • May 25-June 1, 2015

    Paying Attention in Syria