The National Catholic Review

The Word

  • August 18-25, 2014
    Twenty-First Sunday in Ordinary Time (A), Aug. 24, 2014

    One of the most shocking, but welcome, aspects of the Bible is how often power is challenged. It occurs so often in the biblical tradition that we might take it for granted, but the practice of saying uncomfortable things to those who have authority, to speak from a position of weakness to those who have power to harm one’s life or position, is a rarity in antiquity and today. Implicit in this is that those who have power, even those with rightly-ordered...

  • August 18-25, 2014
    Twenty-Second Sunday in Ordinary Time (A), Aug. 31, 2014

    Much modern talk about God tends to reduce the creator to a living doll, who wants to give us a divine cuddle. There is no doubt that the essence of God’s being is love, but the experience of that love and of God’s being is not always an experience of comfort and ease. God can disturb the relaxed meditations of the satisfied and push believers to the breaking point. The awful power of God can overwhelm.

  • August 4-11, 2014
    Nineteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time (A), Aug. 10, 2014

    If you examine older English translations of the Bible, like the Douay-Rheims or the King James Version, a quick search offers you more than 100 instances of the word ghost in each version. Most often these Bibles are translating the Greek phrase hagios pneuma as “Holy Ghost,” while current translations always render it as “Holy Spirit.” The word ghost in modern versions generally translates the Greek word phantasma, found in the...

  • August 4-11, 2014
    Twentieth Sunday in Ordinary Time (A), Aug. 17, 2014

    Some people just do not belong. They might be annoying, they might not “fit,” or they might not be the “right” sort of person. I think you know who I am talking about. That’s right. You and me.

  • July 21-28, 2014
    Eighteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time (A), Aug. 3, 2014

    The Guardian newspaper reported on June 19 that according to a U.N. report, “the number of people forced to flee their homes across the world has exceeded 50 million for the first time since the second world war, an exponential rise that is stretching host countries and aid organisations to breaking point.... Half the world’s refugees are children, many travelling alone or in groups in a desperate quest for sanctuary, and often falling into the...

  • July 21-28, 2014
    Seventeenth Sunday in Ordinary Time (A), July 27, 2014

    Here is a desire new and old: ask for anything in the world and it will be yours! Usually, in fairy tales and legends, three wishes are granted. Then, after poor choices (or ambiguously worded requests), the truth is discovered about what really matters. Lessons are learned the hard way. The First Book of Kings presents us with a somewhat similar scenario, but with the storied wisdom of young king Solomon on display. God “appeared to Solomon in a dream by...

  • July 7-14, 2014
    Sixteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time (A), July 20, 2014

    The parable of the weeds among the wheat is found only in Matthew, and it is an eschatological parable, a parable about the Final Judgment. For gardeners, it evokes memories of hours in the garden, distinguishing between weeds and desirable plants, which is harder to do than one might think, at least for novice gardeners. It raises another question: What constitutes a weed?

  • July 7-14, 2014
    Fifteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time (A), July 13, 2014

    Why did Jesus speak to people in parables? Scholars are agreed beyond doubt that Jesus taught in parables. The parable is a type of speech act in which the speaker attempts to draw comparisons between one thing and another. In fact, the Greek word parabolē might best be translated “comparison.” A parable may be encased in a narrative or in similitudes, by which something is said to be “like” something else.

  • June 23-30, 2014
    Fourteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time (A), July 6, 2014

    How quickly should we move from the literal to the allegorical, figurative or spiritual meaning of words in the Bible? There is no one answer, for in reading the Bible sometimes the literal meaning of a word or a passage is indeed the spiritual meaning itself; at other times, the literal reading grounds a separate spiritual or allegorical meaning; and at still other times, both a literal and figurative meaning exist together.

  • June 23-30, 2014
    Saints Peter and Paul (A), June 29, 2014

    The question for the disciples came from Jesus himself, “Who do people say that the Son of Man is?” The problem for Christians today in answering this question might be how to make sense of Jesus’ humanity in the context of his true divinity. For Jesus’ apostles, standing face to face with the flesh and blood of their friend and teacher, the relevant issue seems not to have been was Jesus God, but what sort of man has God sent to us in Jesus.